Conflict Adaptation

last updated: 15th June, 2017

Cognitive control helps us pay attention to task relevant features of the stimulus and ignore the features that are irrelevant to the current task. In a typical Stroop task, participants respond faster to congruent trials than they respond to incongruent trials.

 

In particular, participants respond faster to congruent trials preceded by congruent trials (c→C) than to congruent trials preceded by incongruent trials (c→I). Such sequential congruency effects demonstrate the use of cognitive control when a conflict (task-irrelevant information) is detected. The hypothesis proposes a conflict-control loop that first detects conflict and then triggers feedback mechanisms to resolve the conflict. If the current trial has conflict, more cognitive control is employed to deal with future instances of conflict. Most studies suggest that specific conditions may be necessary for the conflict control mechanism to generalise from one task to another in a task-switching paradigm. Our study focuses on the specific conditions necessary for the conflict control to generalise across two tasks.

 

 

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